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Jay Stone and Katherine Monk movie reviews and profiles. Movies new to streaming / DVD.
Reviews of Canadian movies and filmmaker profiles by Katherine Monk and Jay Stone.

Movie review: The Dressmaker just doesn’t fit

This eccentric comedy/drama features Kate Winslet as a fashion designer who returns to her Australian home town to learn about her past — only to find the charms of Liam Hemsworth

For whom the cowbell? Trolls!

Movie review: Trolls If you ever wondered what it would be like to drop acid in the middle of a Michaels craft store, Trolls is all glitter and felt as it scrapbooks happiness to a dance beat
3.5Score

Hacksaw Ridge affirms Gospel of Gibson

Movie Review: Hacksaw Ridge The Academy Award-winning director of Braveheart seeks career redemption in a war movie that grinds the gears of genre via a hero who refuses to carry a gun into battle

Gleason scores, Anthropoid kills, Bad Moms just bad

Home Entertainment: November 1, 2016 Justin Lin puts Star Trek franchise into hyperdrive but fails to engage mental engines but there's plenty of other stars to check out on home platforms this week By Katherine Monk Star Trek Beyond (Directed by: Justin Lin, Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, Simon Pegg) 2.5/5:I wanted to love Star Trek Beyond as much as I enjoyed the other two reboots from mastermind J.J. Abrams, and yet, despite my ample enthusiasm for a franchise that puts friendship and humanity first, this third film starring Chris Pine as James T. Kirk and Zachary Quinto as Mr. Spock failed to make it out of the transporter room in one piece. There are many reasons why Beyond falls from a high orbit, but the most noticeable is the name on the director’s chair. Abrams was busy helming that other sci-fi juggernaut, leaving the Fast and the Furious’s Justin Lin to assemble the pieces and play the cosmic strings. Lin is good at car crashes and man bonding, ...

Konelïne drills deep into the dark heart of colonialism

Movies: Available Light Film Festival Veteran documentary filmmaker Nettie Wild heads North to explore a motherlode of ugly conflict unfolding against a backdrop of pristine beauty in her latest film, Konelïne: Our Land Beautiful By Katherine Monk (Feb. 8, 2016. Updated Oct. 29, 2016) WHITEHORSE, YUKON — “We didn’t want it. We still don’t want it. But it was a done deal when they called us to the table.”Tahltan elder Lillian Moyer was speaking about a transmission line along the once-scenic Highway 37 in Canada’s Yukon, but the comments she uttered at the premiere of Nettie Wild’s latest documentary, Konelïne - Our land Beautiful, seem applicable to just about every situation that pits traditional First Nations’ values against the continuing colonial reality.From resource extraction in pristine wildlife habitats in the North to condos and casinos on traditional lands in the South, Canada’s colonial history clearly didn’t end with when Europeans left the ...

Inferno: To Hell and Back

Movie review: Inferno Tom Hanks and Felicity Jones get lost in a sea of attractive scenery and classical references in Ron Howard's decryption of Dante's Divine Comedy

Jack Reacher comes up short

Movie review: Jack Reacher Tom Cruise returns as the peripatetic vigilante in a straightforward, if preposterous, adventure whose simplicity reveals how unsuitable the actor is for the role 

Tom Cruise on tiptoe as Jack Reacher

Movie review - Jack Reacher: Never Go Back Looking to reaffirm his brand as an All-American action hero, Tom Cruise reboots Lee Child's franchise about an ex-military cop who operates outside the law to settle ugly scores

Eye candy helps Keeping Up with the Joneses

Movie review: Keeping Up with the Joneses Superbad director Greg Mottola uses action and espionage to pimp out a minivan of a comic premise that seeks to cross the median income divide

Life, death and Andrew Huculiak

People: Interview with Andrew Huculiak Getting metaphysical with the first-time director of Violent means dipping a big toe into the cold, dark waters of existentialism and cozying up with Kierkegaard By Katherine Monk (October 19, 2016) VANCOUVER – A gentle drizzle falls outside, and the faint smell of woolly dampness mingles with the scent of fresh pie. It’s a typical fall day in Vancouver -- wet, dark, and cool -- the perfect backdrop for an interview with Andrew Huculiak.Huculiak is the director behind Violent, easily one of the best first features in Canadian film history, but up until now, it was also one of the most difficult to access.Shot two years ago in Norway with a unilingual Norwegian cast, Violent was invited to Cannes, picked up top prizes at The Vancouver International Film Festival and was shortlisted as Canada’s best foreign film Oscar submission. By all accounts and measures, it should have hit theatres nationwide.Yet, it’s only now, two years later ...