Arts 174 results

Reviews of fine art, classical and opera music, and all things cultured

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Movie review: Disobedience is an uncertain love story

An art photographer and an Orthodox Jewish wife re-ignite a forbidden passion in a romance that never quite finds its footing
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Movie review: The Rider is a slice of the authentic West

A rodeo rider has to leave the life he loves in this film — part documentary, part fiction — about modern-day horsemen  

Movie review: You Were Never Really Here almost isn’t

Joaquin Phoenix plays a tortured, almost silent hit man in Lynne Ramsay's moody thriller about the terrors of the past and the price of violence
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Movie review: Phantom Thread wears well

Movie Review: Phantom Thread In what might be his final movie, Daniel Day-Lewis fully inhabits another of his difficult characters, this time a fashion designer who demands praise and silence.

Here Comes A Regular: A Photographic Archive of The Railway Club

Ex-Press Salon: The Railway Club Regulars Natasha Moric tended bar at Vancouver's Railway Club for more than 20 years, in the days before selfies and Instagram, but she took her camera to work and captured the regulars -- in their comfort zone without filters By Katherine Monk VANCOUVER, BC — Shakespeare said truth was best found at the bottom of a wine cup, which is why bar life has always attracted the artistic eye. Jan Steen created a tradition with his paintings of rosy-cheeked drunkards in the 1600s, followed centuries later by Van Gogh and the Impressionists. Then photography came along and allowed what French writer Pierre Mac Orlan described as the ability “to capture the fantastic forms of life which require at least a second’s immobility to be perceptible.” In the world of street photography, these glimmering moments of truth come to us a flashes in the darkness: a frozen moment of euphoria on the dancefloor, the desperation of a lurid glance near closing ...
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Movie review: Happy End is Haneke at his most elusive

Movie review: Happy End The story of an unhappy French family follows the director's usual pattern of dysfunction and brutal motives, but there's not much to keep us watching

Jay Stone’s Top 10 movies of 2017

Lady Bird: Pretty well the best time I had at the movies this year came from this small, exquisitely observed story that we’ve seen a million times: a young woman comes of age in a small town, fights with her parents and dreams of glory in the big city. But writer/director Greta Gerwig — drawing on her own life — turns this familiar material into a sweet, caustic, and authentic tale of growing up, aided by great performances from Laurie Metcalfe as the exasperated mother and Saoirse Ronan as the complicated young woman. A true gem.   The Florida Project: Filmmaker Sean Baker takes a step up from his previous movie (Tangerine, which was shot on an iPhone) but doesn’t sacrifice any of the grit in the story of people living on the edge of the American dream, in every sense: they inhabit a welfare motel within sight of Disney World in Orlando, Fla. A cast comprised of mostly first-time actors, lead by the preternaturally talented seven-year-old named Brooklyn ...

My TIFF Diary, or The Disaster Artist

Movies: #TIFF17 Jay Stone goes from cornflakes to a promising Canadian movie, stopping along the way to check in with Tommy Wiseau and Margaret Atwood
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The Florida Project on the edges of Disney

Movie Review: The Florida Project A single mother and her precociously savvy daughter scratch out a living in a $38-a-night motel beside Disney World in this gritty look at American life near the bottom

mother! is a lot of bother!

Darren Aronofsky's new movie is a biblical allegory about the invasion of a rural Eden by the vandals of the world. Or perhaps it's not about anything much at all By Jay Stone   TORONTO — In 2006, filmmaker Darren Aronofsky — best known at the time for his disturbing drama Requiem For A Dream — made the absurd cosmic love story The Fountain. It was about a couple chasing one another through the time and space of an irritating cosmos of spiritual set design, and it starred Rachel Weisz, then the director’s romantic partner.   They have since split, and Aronofsky is now dating Jennifer Lawrence, the star of his new movie, mother! After redeeming himself with such films as The Wrestler and Black Swan, he has returned to the murky business of making grand metaphorical showcases for his new love. mother! is another epic of self-regard, this time about nothing less than Creation itself, and the horrors that are visited upon poor Jennifer Lawrence. It has ...